From Waste To Taste: How To Use Leftover Egg Yolks

by Simona Terron

It’s alarming to note that half the food prepared in the US and Europe is wasted every single day. While it’s almost considered normal now to discard food that’s somewhat close to its expiration date, or because it’s been sitting for far too long in your refrigerator or pantry, or sadly because you’re bored to eat it; you can avoid wastage (and save a few bucks).

When it comes to nutrition, egg yolks have earned a bad reputation over the years. As a result, they’re often tossed into the trash, with people consuming only the whites. But newer studies beg to differ. One such study, published in the British Medical Journal, states that an egg a day is not associated with the risk of coronary heart disease, and can in fact, benefit your health. Although egg yolks are linked with high cholesterol, some health experts claim that their sulfur content can help with feminine issues, such as endometriosis. Plus, they contain 100 percent fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E and K, as well as all the carotenoids, lutein and zeaxanthin. So the next time you separate the yolks from the whites, don’t toss them away.

How To Make The Best Of Egg Yolks

  1. Egg yolks can be refrigerated for two to three days, if kept whole in a bowl of water and covered, or placed in a sealed plastic container with no air between the yolks and the lid. If frozen, they can last indefinitely.
  2. Whisk yolks and brush onto pie crusts before baking, so you create a seal that will prevent the crust from getting soggy, and will of course, give it a lovely glaze.
  3. Cook with butter, sugar and the juice as well as zest of citrus fruits like lemons, tangerines and oranges for a tangy, tart curd that can go into key lime pie and lemon bars, or be piped into tarts and on top of cupcakes.
  4. Indulge in a sweet, creamy cocktail like eggnog, or thicken smoothies and shakes by adding yolks to boost their nutritional content, texture and taste.
  5. Prepare a dreamy custard using several yolks, heavy cream or full-fat milk with some sugar and vanilla. You can serve it warm as a sauce such as a crème anglaise, or bake it until firm, or fill a pie with it.
  6. Whip up some mayonnaise using the yolks. Or make some rich aioli. Both go well with several dishes, and are more nutritious and tastier than the store-bought versions.

Go Gourmet With Egg Yolks

  1. Make a pudding the old-school way, using the yolks—either a simple vanilla pudding, or decadent crème brûlée.
  2. Prepare some thick, yellow, creamy hollandaise sauce to have with your Eggs Benedict at brunch, drizzle over steamed veggies such as asparagus, or spoon on top of grilled or roasted dishes like tofu, tuna or salmon. The yolks also make other sauces, such as the rich and cheesy alfredo, or the silkier carbonara.
  3. Create large ravioli and place a yolk in each one before you seal and cook. Watch the runny golden yolk ooze out, when the ravioli is cut open on a plate.
  4. If you do eat beef and are brave enough to enjoy it raw, this is the time to prepare some steak tartare, with a yolk nestled in the center of each individual serving.

Head to our Food section for healthy recipes and the latest food trends.
Also, find quick and easy 
Nutrition tips here.

 

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