Clarifying Shampoo Can Save Your Chemically-Treated Hair

by Trina Remedios

Wearing your hair down for date night is always an option, but for those who like to have some fun with their tresses and get experimental with their hairstyles, there’s a whole host of styling tools, mousses, gels, dryers, and even colors that can help you add some spunk.

And as much as we love a hair makeover, it’s usually short-lived (sometimes just until the end of the night), although the damage it does can take up to six months to repair. To not have to chop off your lengths, three times over, in order to have a head of new, young and healthy hair again, you need to introduce clarifying shampoos into your haircare routine.

Why? Let’s Clarify
Basically, all the residue from your long-wear hair products, chemicals from pool parties, dirt build-up from your surroundings, and germ transfer from the sharing of your hairbrushes need to be dealt with before it’s too late. Clarifying shampoos have a high surfactant-to-water ratio, which helps deep clean your hair. This type of shampoo essentially strips your hair of all the remaining oil and build-up, which is why, if you have excessively dry hair, you need to first try it out and see if it works for you. The shampoo mainly concentrates on removing grease; not on conditioning.

How To
Well, the application is really much like a regular shampoo, although the first time you apply it, you may not notice any lather. Over time, with regular use and as the toxic build-up gets consistently cleaned off, you will notice it lathers up more easily, which is a good sign.

  • Make note that you need just about a nickel-size drop.
  • Work the shampoo in for 60 seconds.
  • Leave it in your hair for 2-3 minutes.
  • Always use conditioner afterwards.

Follow these tips and feel free to use a clarifying shampoo, twice a month. Don’t overdo it for it will strip your hair and scalp of their essential oils and lead to over-drying. Clarifying shampoos are great saves for those who experiment with products, colors and treatments, but are less necessary for virgin (untreated) hair.

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