Shampoo Your Hair The Right Way; Conditions Apply

by Charlene Flanagan

Sometimes, the execution and technique is as important as the solution, and this rule applies to even the simplest things. Yes, there is indeed a right way to wash your face; and sure, the temperature of the water you shower with can make or break your skin. This transcends into haircare as well, where a 4-point checklist will help you maintain the luster in your locks and prevent dandruff build-up.

But, if you’ve taken a closer look at the label on your shampoo recently, you may notice that all the newer ones are asking you to wash your scalp, and not the lengths of your hair. While we’ve always looked at shampooing as a cleansing routine—which is why we leave no strand uncovered—with the advent of conditioners, this process needs to be modified to make room for the new product addition to your haircare arsenal.

Shampoo Secrets
The hair closest to the scalp is the youngest, and therefore, has the most natural oils which when in excess, can lead to dirt build-up and greasiness. Gently massaging your shampoo on to the scalp will help maintain the oil balance and clean your hair at the source, while preventing dandruff.

Condition With Care
On the other hand, your strands and ends are of the aged variety, and are usually drier due to the over-exposure to external elements. This is exactly why, one must reserve the conditioner for the lengths of the hair, to hydrate and moisturize them without greasing up the scalp.

In fact, the only time you should work that shampoo into your strands is when you’ve used product. Usually, the residue of the shampoo that trickles down from the scalp to the lengths is enough to clean your mane. As long as you leave the conditioner in for 3-4 minutes before washing, you’re good to go. Also, be sure to rinse it off with cold water as this will tighten the hair cuticles and add a certain buoyancy to your tresses.

With that in mind, may be it is time to re-assess your hair wash routine and catch up with the changing times.

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