Sticky Rice Recipe

    Thai sticky rice in a bowl
    Shutterstock.com

    Glutinous rice, also known as sticky rice, is a staple food in Thailand and many parts of Asia. If you’ve enjoyed this kind of sticky recipe before, then you’ve probably wondered how to make sticky rice at home.

    Thai sticky rice like this is very easy to make at home. You need to first know what sticky rice brands to consider, as sticky rice is not the same as many of the other types of long or short grain rice products you see in the store. Sticky rice is very low in amylose content and very high in amylopectin, which is what makes the rice “sticky.”

    Some of our favorite brands include Sanpatong’s sweet rice and Nishiki’s Medium Grain Rice. You can use either brand to create delicious dessert recipes like Thai mango sticky rice.

    If you’re looking to just learn how to make the sticky rice component for numerous Thai dishes, you are at the perfect destination. The key with any sticky rice recipe is to make sure you allow the rice enough time to soak in water. The longer it soaks in water, the more authentic the texture and flavor will be.

    You can also make this sticky rice in a rice cooker with much success. Just remember to leave ample time to soak your rice in water before you actually turn the rice cooker on and cook the sticky rice.

    Summary

    Cook time: 20 Minutes
    Prep time: 10 Minutes
    Idle time: 4 Hours
    Level
    Servings: People
    Unit:

    Ingredients

    Instructions

    1. Soak the rice in a large bowl of water for at least 4 hours but preferably overnight.
    2. Bring 4 cups of water to a boil in a steamer pot over high heat. Drain the soaking liquid from the rice and transfer the rice to the bamboo steamer basket. Set the basket in the pot. Cover with a pan lid. Cook for 10 minutes.
    3. Remove the steamer basket from atop the pot and squeeze the basket to help loosen the rice. With a quick flick of the wrist, flip the rice once. Return the basket to the pot, cover, and let steam for another 10 minutes or until the rice is tender and sticky.
    4. Let rest for 10 minutes and serve warm.

    Additional information

    Updated by Beeta Hashempour on 7/29/2018

    Jet Tila is a nationally renowned chef of all styles of Asian cuisine and host of Z Living's TV show Chasing The Yum. His passion for Asian food began at an early age. As a boy, he spent time learning the ancient traditions of classical Asian cuisine in family restaurants and at the Bangkok Market. At age 10, Jet realized his deep connection to food sprung from a deeper connection to his history; learning family traditions from his Cantonese grandmother further piqued his interest. In his early teens, Jet was making appetizers at his family’s restaurants. At 22, he was teaching cooking classes in his backyard a phenomenon that caught the attention of The Los Angeles Times. Chef Jet’s Le Cordon Bleu education, coupled with his extensive knowledge of Asian gastronomy, have given him a wide range of ideas to draw upon and a broad framework to craft incomparable and innovative cuisine. In culinary school, Jet began to develop his style by seeking novel and inventive ways to approach Eastern ingredients with classical French technique. He has also completed an intensive program of study at the California Sushi Academy. Chef Jet has written two cover pieces and several articles for the food section of The Los Angeles Times and has been featured in Los Angeles magazine. He has appeared on Food TV’s “The Best Of,” “Food Finds” and “The Secret Life Of”; The Learning Channel’s “No Reservations” with Chef Anthony Bourdain and “Take Home Chef”; HGTV’s “Smart Solutions” and “Weekend Entertaining”; PBS’s “Visiting With Huell Howser”; and is a frequent contributor to National Public Radio’s “Good Food” with Evan Kleiman. Chef Jet was awarded the Los Angeles Times best recipe of the year for his Tom Yum soup and his Tom Kha Gai soup was named one of the 10 best recipes of 2000. More recently, Jet was responsible for opening the Pacific Cafe at Google headquarters in Silicon Valley. He holds the Guinness World Record for the “World’s Largest Stirfry” at 1,805 pounds. Chef Jet is highly sought after to consult, teach cooking classes and cater meals; he is the Asian food consultant to the Bon Appetit management company.